Hybridization on the example of the 7DCT300 and 7HDT300

The video shows the installation space advantage of the 7HDT300, the axle-parallel connection of the electric motor and the possible modes.

Maximum driving pleasure and minimum fuel consumption with Magna transmissions
Maximum driving pleasure and minimum fuel consumption with Magna transmissions

Hybridization of the dual clutch transmission

Magna hybridizes a front transverse-mounted dual-clutch transmission with torque split technology. It requires no extra space. The installation length doesn’t change, and the hybrid transmission is only slightly larger than the underlying dual clutch transmission.

In contrast to a typical parallel hybrid, with Magna , the electric motor is connected parallel to the axle within the transmission housing through a simple gear set. This allows use of a very compact high-RPM electric motor.

The electrical power can be scaled almost as desired — from a 48-volt mild hybrid to a plug-in hybrid. In a mild hybrid, continuous electrical power of over 10 kW is possible, and a plug-in hybrid can work with a 75 kW electric motor, for example. With a small, high-RPM electric motor, the size of the transmission remains unchanged.

7HDT300

15 to 80 percent fuel savings

The hybrid transmission offers the same efficiency advantages as the basic transmission. The additional fuel savings allowed by electrification depends on the level of hybridization: from about 15 percent with a mild hybrid to 80 percent with a plug-in hybrid, measured in the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC).

Hybridization on the example of the 7DCT300 and 7HDT300

The video shows the installation space advantage of the 7HDT300, the axle-parallel connection of the electric motor and the possible modes.

Custom hybridization through torque split technology

Transmission Systems torque split architecture allows hybridization of dual-clutch transmissions, almost regardless of installation space. It can be used for custom solutions for mild to plug-in hybrids.

Hybrid powertrains are necessary to meet ever more stringent fuel economy and emission regulations. Plug-in hybrids also allow pure electrical driving in the world’s metropolitan regions. However, the global market demands custom solutions for differing regional requirements.

Torque-split technology

Connection regardless of installation space

In a parallel hybrid, the electric motor is usually placed between the engine and the transmission. On the other hand, a simple gear set connects a torque split hybrid to one of the two sub-transmissions parallel to the axle.

This means the electric motor can be run at a significantly lower maximum RPM, which is lighter and more economical and does not change the installation length of the engine-transmission group.

The hybrid powertrain is only slightly larger than the underlying dual-clutch transmission.

Scaling as needed

A torque split hybrid can be scaled from a 48 V mild hybrid to a 400 V plug-in hybrid. The electric motor and the internal combustion engine can also use different gears, so that they can both be operated with optimal efficiency.

The very compact electric motor also creates the ability to vary the electrical power. With no extra installation room needed, it can be scaled from the typical 15 kW to over 75 kW. In any case, the hybrid transmission is barely larger than the basic transmission. This means that a passenger car model can be built with variously scaled powertrain variants — from the conventional drive, to the mild to plug-in hybrid.

Installation space neutrality of the hybrid transmission kit

Installation-space-neutral hybridization allows custom solutions by changing just one assembly. Freely scalable from mild to plug-in hybrid.

One vehicle platform — three powertrain designs

Hybridization with torque split technology uses an electric motor that is connected to a sub-transmission by a simple gear set, parallel to the axle.

This is considerably more compact and lighter than the “hybrid disks” of a parallel hybrid, and it doesn’t change the installation length of the engine-transmission group.

With this, torque split technology allows use of three powertrain designs on a single platform. Examples include:

  • a conventional powertrain with an internal combustion engine and dual clutch transmission
  • a mild hybrid with an internal combustion engine and a 48V electric motor integrated into the hybrid transmission
  • a plug-in hybrid with an internal combustion engine and a 400V electric motor integrated into the hybrid transmission